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Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 230)

Cognitive psychology is the study of internal mental processes. This course will examine the cognitive processes of perception, attention, memory, imagery, language, problem-solving, and decision-making. Many concepts in cognitive psychology are abstract and not easily understood for new students. As such, this course employs CogLab – an interactive online laboratory where you will run demonstrations of classical experiments and concepts from cognitive psychology.


Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYC 434)

Cognitive neuroscience is the study of the relation between the brain and the mind. This course will approach cognitive neuroscience by integrating coverage of brain imaging, computer modeling, patient studies, and animal research. We will investigate the domains of hemispheric lateralization, object recognition, spatial processing, attention, language, memory, emotion, and executive functions. The course concludes with an examination of how cognitive and neural processes change across the lifespan.


Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory (PSYC 739)

Cognitive neuroscience is the study of the relationship between the brain and the mind. This course will focus specifically on the cognitive neuroscience of human memory. Importantly, memory is not a unitary faculty. Rather, it consists of multiple functional systems, each with its own processing characteristics and neurobiological substrates. This course will highlight recent research regarding the cognitive and neural architecture of working memory, episodic memory, semantic memory, false memory, and various forms of non-declarative memory. A strong emphasis will be placed on studies utilizing functional neuroimaging, neuropsychological investigations, and animal models.


Cognitive Aging (PSCY 743)

This course examines theories of human cognitive aging and how these theories seek to explain age-group differences in various domains of adult cognitive functioning (such as episodic memory, prospective memory, language, emotion, judgment and decision making). We will also examine particular methodological challenges of cognitive-aging research and possible solutions. The course will conclude with an examination of age-related diseases (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease), allowing a discussion of the extent to which these disease processes differ from those of healthy aging.


Functional MRI Methods (PSYC 795)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the technique of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Each week’s session will be composed of a lecture and laboratory (or discussion). There are four main objectives for the course: (1) Students will learn the basic physics underlying MRI; the biological principles of fMRI, the principles of experimental design, the processing steps for data analysis, the use of available software packages, and special considerations for patient research; (2) Students will understand major trends in the current literature on fMRI and be able to identify major leaders in the field and their theoretical and empirical contributions; Students will critically review primary-source empirical articles and comprehensive reviews, and will be able to stimulate and sustain active scholarly discussion about this literature; Students will identify a topic of interest in the fMRI literature and develop an independent research project that builds on knowledge gained in the class.


Seminar in Biomedical Imaging Science (PSYC 890)

This course examines theories of human cognitive aging and how these theories seek to explain age-group differences in various domains of adult cognitive functioning (such as episodic memory, prospective memory, language, emotion, judgment and decision making). We will also examine particular methodological challenges of cognitive-aging research and possible solutions. The course will conclude with an examination of age-related diseases (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease), allowing a discussion of the extent to which these disease processes differ from those of healthy aging.